Category: Field reports (Page 2 of 2)

Jadeja’s sword cuts deep

Economic Times, March 28

With bat and ball, Jadeja showed why is India’s MVP, Man of the Match and Series
© Economic Times

He rides horses, he plays with swords, he owns a restaurant, oh and he bats, bowls and fields well enough to turn a Test match on its head. What’s not to like about Ravindra Jadeja? For years Jadeja had to put up with cruel ridicule from fans who thought this creature was more strange than wonderful. Was he a bowler who could bat a bit? Was he a batsman who might chip in with the ball? Those questions and several others were answered in Dharamsala on Monday, when Jadeja came up with the kind of performance worthy of any allrounder worth his name, and tipped the scales firmly in India’s favour.

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Day 2: Dharamsala decider evenly poised

Economic Times, March 27

At the end of the second day the match was poised on knife’s edge
© Economic Times

Ask, and it shall be given you; seek and you will find; knock and it shall be opened unto you. The Australian cricket team might have met the Dalai Lama on the eve of the Dharamsala Test, but it was these words, Matthew 7:7, from the King James Bible that typified their effort on a second day’s play that left the game poised on the proverbial knife’s edge.

Josh Hazlewood asked questions with the dexterity and tact of an interrogator wearing down a stubborn suspect, marrying nagging accuracy and monstrous movement off the cracks in the pitch, and the wicket of M Vijay was given to him, the batsman playing at a ball that was short enough to leave after being given a torrid time.

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India barter Kohli’s fire for Rahane’s ice

Ajinkya Rahane

Ajinkya Rahane showed his own brand of aggression when he was captain in Dharamsala
© The Scroll

In a series that has been dominated by talk of Virat Kohli even if his bat has not done the talking in the manner he would have liked, the final chapter unfolded with the protagonist forced to take a back seat. And, as they have done all series, Kohli’s mates picked up the slack, giving themselves every chance of forcing a result, even if predicting such things at the end of one day of five is fraught with risk.

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Chinnaswamy Stadium

India wins, Indians live and love

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Chinnaswamy Stadium

To be in the stands and watch the Indian team give back the love they get each day was priceless.
© Anand Vasu

“It’s a great day for singin’ a song and it’s a great day for movin’ along. And it’s a great day from morning to night. And it’s a great day for everybody’s plight.”

The immortal Lt. Col. Frank Slade, played by the peerless Al Pacino in the timeless movie, Scent of a Woman, goes from being the grumpiest sourpuss on the planet to the happiest man in the world in a classic scene that anyone who has watched the movie will remember as long as they live. To be at the M Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore, a nameless face among a throbbing sea of humanity in the stands of a great cricket ground on a day when the home team overcame a determined and worthy adversary was perhaps the closest one could come to feeling the euphoria that Pacino so expertly encapsulated.

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Curator Lyon turns Bangalore pitch to home advantage

Pressure, pressure, pressure. Nathan Lyon tightened the screws and India's batsmen had nowhere to hide.

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Kohli hints at Bangalore surprises

Virat Kohli speaks to the media

Virat Kohli has a bit of fun with the media at his press conference
© Anand Vasu

Virat Kohli has spent half his international career being the angry young man of Indian cricket. The captain, however has chosen a distinctly more amicable path in his latest avatar. Having lost the first Test against Australia by the crushing margin of 333 runs, Kohli knew that he was likely to be asked some annoying questions ahead of the second Test in Bangalore. He focussed on the team’s lack of intent at key moments of the first Test, and bantered cheerfully with journalists who mustered the temerity to try and poke a reaction out of him. Excerpts:

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Pitch obsession leaves Kumble in a spin

If you watched Indian cricket in the late 1990s or the 2000s you will be familiar with this scene. The batsman has been drawn forward by the legspinner, beaten in the air or off the pitch and just as the bowler begins to celebrate he sees that the wicketkeeper was also beaten and the ball has run away for four byes. Anil Kumble would do his best to hide his true feelings at such moments, but the disappointment of the prey eluding a carefully laid trap would shine through. No cussing, no yelling, but that piercing look down the length of 22 yards left no-one in any doubt about what happened.

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